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Posts Tagged ‘parmesan’

False Bay Rosè with Lasagna Senza Carne

Preparation Time: 60 minutes Cooking Time: 60 minutes Yield: 4

It’s hard to not believe in serendipity when the perfect wine for a dish you’ve just crafted lands on your doorstep.

In the very week that I created this recipe, a gift pack of False Bay wines from the nearby Waterkloof Estate arrived.

False Bay is Waterkloof’s entry level range, which consists of three whites, a rosè and two reds. They’re all affordable quaffers, at around R55 per bottle at the cellar door, and although they’re not made from grapes grown on the farm, cellar master Werner Engelbrecht affords their making the same attention as he does the Peacock Ridge, Circumstance, Circle of Life and Waterkloof wines. The Rosè turned out to be the perfect match with this dish, although we opened the Sauvignon Blanc to drink while cooking anyway! And so to the recipe….

The origin of the name of a dish is often the most fascinating thing to track down. Paella, that quintessential Spanish dish is one such. The name describes neither the dish itself, nor any one of its ingredients. Rather, it describes the pan in which the dish is prepared, and traditionally served. The paella is a large shallow pan with two handles, purpose designed for the preparation of the much loved Valencian dish.

Lasagna, my research reveals is also named after the utensil in which it was traditionally prepared. Legend has it that the Romans borrowed the Greek word “lasana” (trivet or stand for a pot) or “lasanon” (chamber pot) which became “lasanum” in Latin, and means cooking pot. And so over time, the utensil in which the dish was prepared became the name of the dish, which became lasagna in modern Italian. Read more…

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De Wetshof Chardonnay d’Honneur and Cannelloni

September 29, 2010 Leave a comment
Preparation Time: 60 minutes Cooking Time: 90 minutes Yield: 4

Cannelloni it seems means “large reed”, an apt description for the large pasta tubes with a savoury stuffing that carry the name, except that they are actually manicotti.

Cannelloni are made from a rectangle of cooked pasta, into which a savoury filling is rolled, then baked in either a tomato or béchamel sauce.

The closest one can come to real cannelloni without a pasta maker, is to use lasagne sheets in which to wrap your selected filling. Alternatively, one can buy what are called cannelloni tubes (but which are really manicotti!) and use them instead. They tend to be a bit finicky, because once cooked they are quite delicate, so I’d opt for the lasagne sheets instead, if you do not have a pasta maker. Read more…

Wild mushroom risotto & Groote Post 2010 Sauvignon Blanc Reserve

Sumptuous wild mushroom risotto

When you get invited to go wild mushroom picking for the first time, you accept with alacrity. What you also do, when the phone call does come – this is a weather dependent exercise – you drop everything and go. Why is it then, that it took three consecutive invitations from Anita Bunn to get me to actually put on my hiking boots, gather a basket and serrated edge knife, and meet her at the appointed place? As much as I’d love to divulge where that is, it is more than my life is worth. I have a very clear picture in my mind of Anita, serrated knife casually in hand, as she asked me not let on. My lips are sealed!

The first trip, which involved quite a bit of tramping about in dank dripping woods yielded a crop of poplar mushrooms and what Anita calls sticky Bolitus mushrooms. They’re better for making stock than for eating, so that’s what I did with them. Read more…

Feta and Basil Stuffed Calamari

June 15, 2010 1 comment
Preparation Time: 60 minutes Cooking Time: 45 minutes Yield: 4-6

The genesis of a recipe can be fascinating. A reader stopped me at the gym other day, and asked if I’d ever eaten calamari tubes stuffed with feta and basil. Seems he’d enjoyed the dish at a local restaurant, and wanted to replicate the dish at home.

That was more than enough to send me off on a wild goose chase, in search of a suitable recipe, but after trawling the Internet, and my not inconsiderable collection of recipe books – from Larousse Gastronomique to Stephanie Alexander’s “The Cook’s Companion” all the way from the land of sheep and South African ex-pats – ended up drawing a blank. Read more…